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Why Vince McMahon Hasn’t Issued New WWE Talent Policy Before Now, More on Recent Changes

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WWE Chairman & CEO Vince McMahon reportedly talked about there being a problem with wrestlers using third party platforms months ago.

We’ve noted how WWE recently issued an edict that called on talents to cease activity on third party platforms within 30 days, such as Cameo or Twitch. The edict stated that repeat violations could lead to fines, suspension or termination. Since then it’s been clarified that talent will be able to maintain both Twitch and YouTube accounts, but they have to do so using their real names, not their WWE ring names. Talents were also told that they have to inform the company of their YouTube and Twitch accounts, even though they will be using their real names. WWE officials reportedly made it clear that talents are encouraged to be on social media and expand their brand, but they cannot monetize their WWE names.

In an update, the Wrestling Observer Newsletter reports that Vince originally wanted to put a stop to the third party activity earlier this year, but the COVID-19 pandemic hit before he could take action, and that was delayed. Vince had reportedly talked about issuing the edict a few times before that, but never pulled the trigger.

While the edict was addressed at recent WWE TV tapings, it’s been noted how things are still vague as far as what is allowed and what is not. A source noted to the Observer that the vagueness is due to the fact that nothing is etched in stone and it constantly changes.

One talent reported to the Observer that at this week’s RAW they were told they would have to switch to using their real names, instead of their WWE names for Twitch and YouTube, but would still have to let the company know. A few days before that, Mark Carrano of WWE Talent Relations reportedly told wrestlers that WWE also owns their real names, and that the talent could not get around the new policy by using their real names. It appears that this was clarified at RAW.

WWE officials were reportedly not happy with wrestlers using their WWE names in sponsorship deals. The Observer also noted that the new policy will be determined through specifics and communication between officials and talent, or on a case-by-case basis.

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