AEW News

FTR Talks Vince McMahon’s Creative Process, Their Thoughts On What Makes A Good Heel and more

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AEW starts Dax Harwood and Cash Wheeler, better known as FTR, were recent guest on WWE Hall of Famer Vickie Guerrero’s “Excuse Me” podcast. Highlights can be found below.

How the creative process works with Vince McMahon:

“Vince wants to hear ideas. Whether he wants to use them is up to him. But, the 130 people that you have to go through to give those ideas, they are so afraid to be face to face with him. It blows my mind. I understand he is an enigma. I understand he’s created his own legacy in the minds of people in the business. But, they are so afraid of losing their job because they pitch an idea but want to stay as low key as possible because they want to get a paycheck the next week. That is sad.”

On their debut in a truck:

“When we were talking about the entrance and how we wanted to debut, we talked about Eddie (Guerrero) and we talked about Stone Cold as influences because they were two guys who regularly drove some kind of vehicle to the ring. Eddie always had a badass classic car. We thought maybe we could do something like that.”

What they think it takes to be a good heel:

“People think getting the heat is to grab a chinlock, come up, three elbows, stop that babyface and give them one of your cool moves. That’s not being a heel. That’s not making your babyface. We don’t need to do these overly convoluted spots that don’t make sense and embarrass and expose the business.”

On WWE’s style of wrestling:

“Wrestling has always been built around emotion, or it should be. From bell to bell, I’m always going to think about what emotion I can strike at this moment. I’ve never felt pressure to change. In WWE, I don’t think we got the opportunities we should have gotten because they operate a different style. You have to have a certain move set sometimes.”

On Bret Hart:

“There were a lot more guys that were more over than Bret like Austin, Hogan and The Rock. There were never guys who were over to the level he was that people cared about him in a certain way. I don’t know what it was about it, but I was and still in love with him. He is my hero. There are times I am sitting there watching his matches and I almost get to the point of being emotional with my wife sitting next to me who is asking if I’m ok. He’s incredible. He made you believe in something. That’s what I want to do. I want you to believe in something. There were guys that were more over but not guys that were more beloved by their fans than Bret. Some of those guys were transcendent. Bret was the guy you knew was human and that’s why you loved him. He got you to care about what he was doing. You felt sympathy for him. He was the underdog all the time. But, because he worked so hard and he tried so much and never gave up, he was able to overcome everything and make this unbelievably successful career and that’s what Bret was able to do. He was able to humanize himself and make you relate to him in every single way that you were invested in his every step.”

Full interview can be found here. (H/T and transcribed by Wrestling News)

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